4 Directions of Emotion: 2 good 2 bad

Sample of these directional emotions

What we regard as good or bad is largely subjective. Our emotions provide immediate assessment of our needs, delivering any sense of urgency over any regard for accuracy. So our conceptions of good or bad can easily become muddled in our own perceptions of what is good or bad for our own needs first. And then for those closes to us, especially upon those we depend for our many needs.

 

What we regard as good or bad is also largely social. As social beings, we are naturally drawn to what we regard as good for those closest to us, and against what we regard is bad for them. And we naturally anticipate those with the means to regard the same toward us. When we need them the most we must be able to trust they will be responsive to us, and our understanding of what is good and bad.

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"There's a time to plant and a time to reap."

 

What if there was a tool to find when it's best to plant relationships and when to reap from them? Now there is.

Relationship

Seasons

Seasons define our time, not some machine

about this new field called indigentology, the study of human need.

 

But to be fair,

it is (so far)

the only blog about this new field called indigentology.

 

The blog takes these ideas and tries to make them plain.

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Our socially shaped subjective experiences seek to maintain what we agree is good, and promptly change what we see as bad. We want to promptly remove any threats (dynamic) and keep them away for as long as possible (static). We want to replenish any consumed resources (dynamic) and maintain their stock for as long as possible (static). Relief and pleasure cover what we judge as good. Persisting pain and unfulfilled desire cover what we judge as bad. Since emotions convey need experiences, all emotional experiences will fall under one of these four quadrants.

 
Good for you
 

Reflect on whatever you are feeling right now. Or felt a moment ago. Isolate a single feeling. How would you categorize it?

 

Would you consider it a good feeling? Or a bad feeling? What makes it good? Or bad?

 

For each "good" feeling you feel, can you feel yourself returning to some sense of preferred balance? For each "bad" feeling you feel, can you feel yourself encountering something you'd rather avoid?

 

There is no good or bad except for need, and there is no need except for homeostasis. Can you think of any exceptions to this assertion? If you can then please share it below. I may need to revise this, good or bad.

Keeping this all in perspective

 

 
 
 
 

Each emotion conveys an experience with need. Two intersecting dimensions form four basic categories for understanding these need communicating emotions.

 

Persisting pain and unfulfilled desire form the dimension we generally label as bad, along with anything contributing to such feelings. Relief and pleasure form the dimension we generally label as good, along with anything contributing to these typically preferred feelings.

 

Outside of these experiences of need and their contributing factors there is little if anything we regard as good or bad.

Relief:
 
Removed, pushed out (static)
 
Relief is the emotional experience after you effectively REACT to have effectively removed some excess resource or have some threat pushed out, indicating a likely restored homeostatic functioning.
 
This typically reports the level of effectiveness of the reaction. Sometimes this spells relief from the reporting emotion without actual removal of the originating threat.
 
 
 
 
Pleasure:
 
Replenished, pulled in (static)

 

Pleasure is the emotional experience after you effectively REACT to have some depleted resource replenished or have pulled in some source to fill a void, indicating a likely return to normal homeostatic functioning.

 

This typically reports the level of effectiveness of the reaction. Sometimes the pleasure conveys a satisfaction level toward a substitute, without indicating the status of the originally reported depleted level.

 
Pain:
 
Remove, push out (dynamic)
 
Pain is the emotional experience when you are ROUSED to effectively remove some excess resource or to push out some threat, perceived or real, in order to restore homeostatic functioning.
 
The further from perceived equilibrium, especially the more essential for functioning, the generally more intense the arousal. And hence the generally more urgent the reaction for relief.
 
Desire:
 
Replenish, pull in (dynamic)

 

Desire is the emotional experience when you are ROUSED to effectively replenish some depleted resource or to pull in some source to fill a void, in order to restore homeostatic functioning.

 

The more depleted the resource or lack of alternatives, especially if essential for functioning, the generally more intense and obsessive the desire. Desire can shift to a substitute for temporary relief from the pain expressing a threat from unfilled desire.

4 Directions for Needs

anger

encouraged

accepted

fear

disappointment

guilt

depression

energized

relaxed

appreciated

freed

embraced

secured

for affection

to belong

for autonomy

for affirmation

to be appreciated

jealousy

loved

forgiven

good and bad, I define these terms...

 

Looking at emotions from this need conveying perspective is less dependent upon given labels for feelings. Our language for feelings will tend to favor the more intense emotions. The more subtle experiences or complex may need a set of words.

 

We may also see some significant overlap. Our language may have the same word for feeling the need as for feeling its resolution. This approach tends to transcend the limits of language, and get outside of the limits posed by postmodernist critique of conventions. And there is much more to this in the conventionality section

 

solving problems by resolving needs
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